Crescent Gardens, Harrogate
Crescent Gardens, Harrogate
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Company that had grand plans for Crescent Gardens enters liquidation owing nearly £11million

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The company that had planned to purchase the previous Borough Council HQ building, Crescent Gardens has gone into liquidation owing nearly £11million.

The company is listed as ATP (CRESCENT GARDENS) LIMITED Company number 10384515 with Companies House.

They had plans for £75million redevelopment of the building, including an underground car park and swimming pool, a , gallery and flats.

The company has one active officer, Adam James Robert Thorpe.

Debts include £24, 394 to and  £265,801 to HMRC.

The largest single debt is of £10.2million to Longbay Consulting in Harrogate.

See https://beta.companieshouse.gov.uk/company/10384515/filing-history and “statement of affairs” to see the full list of money owed.

Harrogate Borough Council put the building back on the market in June 2019, after documents were not submitted to them from by ATP (CRESCENT GARDENS) LIMITED.





 


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